Safety move to stop bin men moving wheelie bins is branded as "ridiculous"

Safety move to stop bin men moving wheelie bins is branded as "ridiculous"

Bins on the steep streets around Skipton. (9062521)

Paul English: Liberal Democrat candidate for Skipton West (9705214)

First published in News
Last updated
Craven Herald: Photograph of the Author by , Senior Reporter

A HEALTH and safety move which could mean bin men being told to stop moving wheelie bins has been branded as "ridiculous" by a Craven councillor.

Currently about 20 per cent of Craven residents who live in inaccessible places have their bins taken to a waste lorry by council workmen.

But following a recent inspection by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), Craven District Council has been told the practice must stop and collections must be kerbside only.

Cllr Carl Lis, lead member for waste management, told fellow councillors they had no option but to act.

He said the issue was council staff moving bins over long distances, but arrangements would have to be made for vulnerable residents.

"There will be people who are old and infirm and we have a duty to collect their bins. I don't know what we will do at the moment, but officers are working on it," he said.

But Cllr Paul English said there would be people in every ward who would find it difficult to move their own bins.

"It seems strange that we are being told that there is too much risk for trained professionals to move wheelie bins, but little old ladies can.

"Sometimes, I just shake my head. Refuse collectors are refuse collectors, that is what they are employed to do. It seems more than more we can't let them do the job they are employed to do, it is ridiculous."

A spokesman for the HSE said the council's waste collection service had been inspected as part of a rolling programme of similar inspections of authorities across the country.

"HSE recommended that Craven District Council moved to kerbside collections to reduce the risk to employees of sustaining injuries from manual handling.

"HSE also made further recommendations regarding reversing of collection trucks so staff are better protected from moving vehicles; assessing risks of the bin rounds being undertaken, and ensuring the authority has a source of competent health and safety advice."

The spokesman added: "The council is making progress adopting the recommendations to bring them into line with current best practice."

Paul Florentine, Craven's waste and recycling manager, said the council had been working with the HSE to make sure the processes it adopted provided the best service to its customers while at the same time complying with its legal obligations.

He added the service was now under review and no changes had been brought in so far.

"If these changes are adopted, they would be ratified through the council's policy committee and each affected household would be individually notified."

He added: "It's worth noting that the council offers an assisted collection service if a householder is unable to present their bins to the kerbside."

Comments (8)

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2:01pm Thu 28 Aug 14

Debacle says...

Placing wheelie bins on a path at the kerb will in many areas of Skipton, especially where the path is already below recommended width, cause an obstruction and a safety hazard to all people using the path.

Will the council have risks assessments done on ALL paths before adopting the HSE recommendation as a number are now already below minimum width as well as being obstructed on collection days?

Someone who does not use a walking aid can manage to walk along a passage way less than 700mm wide, but just using a walking stick requires greater width than this; a minimum of 750mm. A person who uses two sticks or crutches, or a walking frame needs a minimum of 900mm, a blind person using a long cane or with an assistance dog needs 1100mm. A visually impaired person who is being guided needs a width of 1200mm. A wheelchair user and an ambulant person side-by-side need 1500mm width. width.https://www.go
v.uk/government/uplo
ads/system/uploads/a
ttachment_data/file/
3695/inclusive-mobil
ity.pdf
Placing wheelie bins on a path at the kerb will in many areas of Skipton, especially where the path is already below recommended width, cause an obstruction and a safety hazard to all people using the path. Will the council have risks assessments done on ALL paths before adopting the HSE recommendation as a number are now already below minimum width as well as being obstructed on collection days? Someone who does not use a walking aid can manage to walk along a passage way less than 700mm wide, but just using a walking stick requires greater width than this; a minimum of 750mm. A person who uses two sticks or crutches, or a walking frame needs a minimum of 900mm, a blind person using a long cane or with an assistance dog needs 1100mm. A visually impaired person who is being guided needs a width of 1200mm. A wheelchair user and an ambulant person side-by-side need 1500mm width. width.https://www.go v.uk/government/uplo ads/system/uploads/a ttachment_data/file/ 3695/inclusive-mobil ity.pdf Debacle
  • Score: 9

2:02pm Thu 28 Aug 14

Debacle says...

Placing wheelie bins on a path at the kerb will in many areas of Skipton, especially where the path is already below recommended width, cause an obstruction and a safety hazard to all people using the path.

Will the council have risks assessments done on ALL paths before adopting the HSE recommendation as a number are now already below minimum width as well as being obstructed on collection days?

Someone who does not use a walking aid can manage to walk along a passage way less than 700mm wide, but just using a walking stick requires greater width than this; a minimum of 750mm. A person who uses two sticks or crutches, or a walking frame needs a minimum of 900mm, a blind person using a long cane or with an assistance dog needs 1100mm. A visually impaired person who is being guided needs a width of 1200mm. A wheelchair user and an ambulant person side-by-side need 1500mm width. width.https://www.go
v.uk/government/uplo
ads/system/uploads/a
ttachment_data/file/
3695/inclusive-mobil
ity.pdf
Placing wheelie bins on a path at the kerb will in many areas of Skipton, especially where the path is already below recommended width, cause an obstruction and a safety hazard to all people using the path. Will the council have risks assessments done on ALL paths before adopting the HSE recommendation as a number are now already below minimum width as well as being obstructed on collection days? Someone who does not use a walking aid can manage to walk along a passage way less than 700mm wide, but just using a walking stick requires greater width than this; a minimum of 750mm. A person who uses two sticks or crutches, or a walking frame needs a minimum of 900mm, a blind person using a long cane or with an assistance dog needs 1100mm. A visually impaired person who is being guided needs a width of 1200mm. A wheelchair user and an ambulant person side-by-side need 1500mm width. width.https://www.go v.uk/government/uplo ads/system/uploads/a ttachment_data/file/ 3695/inclusive-mobil ity.pdf Debacle
  • Score: 0

4:58pm Thu 28 Aug 14

jorg69 says...

How a wheelie bin on wheels should be a HSE issue is beyond me, no lifting involved, wheel up to lorry, automatic lift, return empty bin on wheels to household, does that sound difficult ? How can that can be a HSE issue ? next we will be wheeling our own bins up to the tip.
How a wheelie bin on wheels should be a HSE issue is beyond me, no lifting involved, wheel up to lorry, automatic lift, return empty bin on wheels to household, does that sound difficult ? How can that can be a HSE issue ? next we will be wheeling our own bins up to the tip. jorg69
  • Score: 19

9:26am Fri 29 Aug 14

Skipton Ratepayer says...

Add to the above double-buggies, parent holding hand of small child side by side, person carrying several bags and lots of other possibilities. Bins all over the pavements are already a nuisance, don't make it worse.
I have to get my bin down 4 steep steps, quite hard if it's full, but the bin men don't. They just have to take it a few yards on the level. How can this hurt them?
Add to the above double-buggies, parent holding hand of small child side by side, person carrying several bags and lots of other possibilities. Bins all over the pavements are already a nuisance, don't make it worse. I have to get my bin down 4 steep steps, quite hard if it's full, but the bin men don't. They just have to take it a few yards on the level. How can this hurt them? Skipton Ratepayer
  • Score: 9

1:59pm Fri 29 Aug 14

otter says...

Absolutely ridiculous!
The system as it operates now, although officially an edge of property service, is basically a kerbside system except for those residents who are not able, because of age or infirmity, to move the wheeled bins themselves whereupon the refuse collectors will come into the property to take the bin to the vehicle for emptying and return the bin to its normal spot.
As the other posters have said to place the bins on a pavement and at the kerb edge is inherently less safe for the general public in using the public highway - footpaths and roads. I would question the legality of deliberately obstructing the public highway especially when some people will choose to leave their bins on the highway all the time.
The edge of property collection, as it operates currently, in 99.9 per cent of cases, is no more than a couple of feet from the kerb anyway.
In addition, in Craven District many of its streets and propeties are inaccessible to the large refuse collection vehicles that the Council is now using to provide service. That is not the fault of its residents. The "kerbside", in these cases is some distance from where the collection vehicle collects from anyway. Is the Council going to now invest in smaller vehicles capable of reaching these areas with the obvious reduction in capacity and therefore increase in collection vehicles, staff and cost?
These reports looking at a specific task, must be taken into proper context by the Council and they need to question the wider logic and good sense of such recommendations taking into account other relevant factors that would actually compromise wider health and safety issues. Such issues were no doubt taken properly and correctly into consideration when the original council policy on wheeled bin collection was made.
Absolutely ridiculous! The system as it operates now, although officially an edge of property service, is basically a kerbside system except for those residents who are not able, because of age or infirmity, to move the wheeled bins themselves whereupon the refuse collectors will come into the property to take the bin to the vehicle for emptying and return the bin to its normal spot. As the other posters have said to place the bins on a pavement and at the kerb edge is inherently less safe for the general public in using the public highway - footpaths and roads. I would question the legality of deliberately obstructing the public highway especially when some people will choose to leave their bins on the highway all the time. The edge of property collection, as it operates currently, in 99.9 per cent of cases, is no more than a couple of feet from the kerb anyway. In addition, in Craven District many of its streets and propeties are inaccessible to the large refuse collection vehicles that the Council is now using to provide service. That is not the fault of its residents. The "kerbside", in these cases is some distance from where the collection vehicle collects from anyway. Is the Council going to now invest in smaller vehicles capable of reaching these areas with the obvious reduction in capacity and therefore increase in collection vehicles, staff and cost? These reports looking at a specific task, must be taken into proper context by the Council and they need to question the wider logic and good sense of such recommendations taking into account other relevant factors that would actually compromise wider health and safety issues. Such issues were no doubt taken properly and correctly into consideration when the original council policy on wheeled bin collection was made. otter
  • Score: 6

7:17pm Fri 29 Aug 14

otter says...

Surprisingly, wheeled bins are designed to be wheeled to lessen the risks of handling waste. How can the H.S.E. arrive at the conclusion to wheel them is dangerous?!
Mr Florentine and the Council should have greater concern and, indeed responsibility, for the number of their refuse collection staff that opt to lift wheeled bins bodily by hand and tip one into another in order to save a few seconds in time. Such a practice represents a much greater risk of personal injury.
Surprisingly, wheeled bins are designed to be wheeled to lessen the risks of handling waste. How can the H.S.E. arrive at the conclusion to wheel them is dangerous?! Mr Florentine and the Council should have greater concern and, indeed responsibility, for the number of their refuse collection staff that opt to lift wheeled bins bodily by hand and tip one into another in order to save a few seconds in time. Such a practice represents a much greater risk of personal injury. otter
  • Score: 7

9:00pm Fri 29 Aug 14

lyndagrimmett says...

My suggest why dont the councillors go on the dustcart , I would love to see it , wheelie bins on the pavement on rowland stret, where cars and vans park up with 2 wheeels on the pavement, the bins woild have to be lifted over the tops of cars , there be there all day
My suggest why dont the councillors go on the dustcart , I would love to see it , wheelie bins on the pavement on rowland stret, where cars and vans park up with 2 wheeels on the pavement, the bins woild have to be lifted over the tops of cars , there be there all day lyndagrimmett
  • Score: 4

9:45pm Wed 24 Sep 14

lyndagrimmett says...

Get rid of the bins and go back to bin bags, I live on rowland street and some of our bins have not been emptied in 6 weeks , inform the council, nothing is done ,
As for pushing our bins to a collection point up the steep cobbles , no way , just bag it up each day and put in the town bins ,
If a bin man cant lift a bin , what next
Ambulances where they cant pick up patients
Supermarkets not filling up shelves
Get rid of the bins and go back to bin bags, I live on rowland street and some of our bins have not been emptied in 6 weeks , inform the council, nothing is done , As for pushing our bins to a collection point up the steep cobbles , no way , just bag it up each day and put in the town bins , If a bin man cant lift a bin , what next Ambulances where they cant pick up patients Supermarkets not filling up shelves lyndagrimmett
  • Score: 0

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